1 Peter 1:2 — Peter Presents the Trinity?

According to the foreknowledge of God the Father, in sanctification of the Spirit, to obedience and sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ: Grace to you and peace be multiplied. — 1 Peter 1:2, World English

According to many, this verse speaks of the trinity. A.T. Roberstson says of this verse: “Peter here presents the Trinity (God the Father, the Spirit, Jesus Christ).” (Robertson, A.T. “Commentary on 1 Peter 1:2“. “Robertson’s Word Pictures of the New Testament”. . Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. ) But did Peter here actually present the trinity, or does the idea of trinity have to imagined, assumed and added to what Peter wrote? J. Hampton Keathley, III, writes: “In the salutation of his first epistle, Peter links all three persons of the trinity together, pointing to their respective roles in the process of salvation.” In reality, however, does Peter actually link all three alleged persons of the alleged trinity together? Is there any indication at all that this is what he had in mind?

Peter actually presents God as unipersonal, that is, in the one person of the Father; thus, the trinitarian has to imagine and assume that Peter is saying that not only is the Father is the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, but that the Spirit is also the same one God, and that Jesus is also the same one God. He then has to imagine, assume, and add further that the Father is one person of the one God, and the holy spirit of God is another person of the one God, and that Jesus is another person of the one God. And thus, he is has imagined and assumed that there is one God of three persons.

Furthermore, all through the New Testament (as well as the Old Testament) the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob is presented only as one person, and never as more than one person. The idea of more than one person has to be imagined, assumed, added to, and read into any verse that is presented to alleged support the imagined doctrine of the trinity.

In 1 Peter 1:16, Peter quotes the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, and in 1 Peter 1:17, Peter speaks of the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob unipersonally as the Father of the believer. There is no indication that he thought that the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob was more than one person. This is further shown by 1 Peter 1:3, where Peter refers to the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob as one person: the God and Father of Jesus.

But why does Peter mention all three together if they are not the three of the alleged “Holy Trinity”? The question puts the mind-frame of the trinity over the scripture so as to lead the mind to accept that Peter was speaking of the assumed trinitarian dogma. In fact, however, simply referring to the God and his spirit, as well to God’s son, in one sentence does not mean that all three are the assumed trinity.

In 1 Peter 1:21, Peter tells us that God raised Jesus from the dead. He thus speaks of the God of the Old Testament in terms of one person, not three. This agrees with his statement as recorded in Acts 3:13-26, where Peter speaks of the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, not as three persons, but as one person, who raised Jesus up as the prophet like Moses (Deuteronomy 18:15-19), and raised Jesus from the dead. This same pattern is followed by all of the New Testament writers, that is, they identifiy the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, not as three persons, but as one person, the God and Father of Jesus. See our study on: The Supreme Being of Jesus.

Much of what we said concerning 2 Corinthians 13:14 also applies to 1 Peter 1:2. See our study on: The Three Be With You.

What we do not find is that Peter was presenting or had any thought of the later-added trinitarian dogma in anything that Peter wrote in his letter.

         
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